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Introduction
Video-pool Archive
Symposium
Exhibition & intervention
Support

Papers
Linz Summaries 07
Video Yerevan 06
Urban Screeens 05
Vivid Seminar 04

Video-pool Archive
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Video as Urban Condition
a project exploring how video shapes urban experience

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Video as urban condition is about the ways in which video has become part of the urban fabric: the omnipresent screen and the watchful eye that inhabits private and public space. Video is the ubiquitous equipment of the home, the street and the work place: the tube, the box, the telly, CCTV, info-screen, electronic billboard, in-store advertising, mobile, terrestrial, cable, satellite, pay-per-view, downloadable, for sale, to rent.

Video as urban condition is about how our knowledge, perception and fantasy of urban environments are mediated by video. Video is the mass medium of innumerable fragments, multi-channel, remote control, camcorder, games console, webcam, public service broadcasting, peer-to-peer, MTV, 24-hour news, reality TV, soap opera, family entertainment, pornography, home video.

The project examines a medium whose most distinctive characteristics are multiplicity and diversity, a form which is not contained by the norms of art institutions or the exclusive domains of professionals. Video is a medium of mass production — that is, mass participation — as well as of mass consumption. The accessibility of video technology has encouraged not only the private interests of home video and independent artistic activity, but has also prompted community and educational initiatives putting the medium in the hands of underprivileged or excluded groups in society. Video technology has moreover become established among the tools of communication and witness at the disposal of activists and campaigners who maintain a position beyond the mainstream. At the same time, the power of video as a means of controlling desire and space continues to grow.

The project recognises the diversity of activity in the field and challenges us to reflect on how the relations of representation in society are mediated by video.


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Video-pool Archive
The Video-pool is a collection of collections put together by individuals, each suggesting an interpretation of video as urban condition based on particular areas of interest, experience and expertise. The Video-pool collections represent a variety of approaches and methods, forming a constellation of points of reference.
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Symposium
The project was launched in 2004 with and interdisciplinary symposium which took place at the Austrian Cultural Forum, London (with: Juha Huuskonen (Katastro.fi), Manu Luksch (AmbientTV.net), Anna McCarthy (New York University), Paul O’Connor (Undercurrents News Network), Ole Scheeren (Office of Metropolitan Architecture), chaired by Anthony Auerbach). The aim of the symposium was to open the field of enquiry by examining the implications and applications of video against the background of the myriad forms in which it appears in urban spaces. Both aspects of the topic — video and the city — are understood as interdisciplinary and public. The invited speakers draw on experiences — from architecture to activism — touching on a wide range of practices, interests and locations within the field. What they have in common is what we all share in modern urban life. They do not regard video as an art-specialism, media-sector or single-purpose tool.
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Exhibition and Intervention
The Video-pool archive forms the principal curatorial resouce for a series of exhibitions now in preparation. Informed by discussions such as the Video as ... symposium and the researches of Anthony Auerbach and other contributors, the exhibition proposals explore innovative models of curating and displaying video-content within art institutions as well as the challenge of 'public space'.


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Support
Video as Urban Condition was funded in 2004 by the Austrian Cultural Forum London and the Arts Council of England with additional assistance from the Embasssy of Finland, London, and the Royal Netherlands Embassy, London. In 2005, the visit to Bratislava was was hosted by Burundi media art organisation, supported by the British Council. In 2005–06, the project was supported by a research and development grant from the Arts Council of England, with additional assistance from the Austrian Cultural Forum London. The visit to Yerevan in 2006 was supported by the British Council. The exhibition at the Lentos Museum, Linz, 2007 has been carried out within the framework of ‘translate’ Beyond Culture: The Politics of Translation and with the support of the Culture 2000 programme of the European Union.

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 ‘translate’ Beyond Culture: The Politics of Translation